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SCOTLAND

View from Sgurr an Fhidhleir [digital image]
One of the highlights of my trip was the walk up to Sgurr an Fhidhleir, Coigach, known as The Fiddler, with professional photographer Angus Bruce www.highlandpix.co.uk who is based in Ullapool. The views from the top across to Stac Pollaidh and the mighty Suilven were stunning. On that day the weather was kind to us with amazing light in the late afternoon, which more than compensated for the long walk to the summit and the walk off the mountain using our head-torches in the dark.





Towards Stac Pollaidh
Most of my time was spent in the Inverpolly region with travelling along the road alongside Loch Lurgainn to Achnahaird bay. Over the two week period I had the opportunity to visit locations several times to experience different viewpoints and weather conditions.

During my stay I visited Lochinver past Loch Assynt, avoiding the temptation of visiting the well known pie shop, and then along the coastal road through Drumbeg round to near Kylesku. I was hoping to photograph the mountains of the majestic Quinang but there was low cloud in the region...another day. On a separate occasion I travelled along the Druim Bad Ghaill road, known as the 'bad and mad road', from Lochinver to Achnahaird bay. The tide was out at the bay and the beach revealed a variety of sea plants standing upright out of the sand.

Sandwood Bay
On another day with Angus we visited Sandwood Bay, which is further north on the road to Durness, parking the car at Blairmore followed by a four mile walk to this remote beach. Although it was an incoming tide the location provided several photographic opportunities in the dunes and towards the isolated sea stack at the end of the beach.







I travelled the main road from Ullapool to Inverness, which provided interesting views across Loch Drum and Glascarnoch. The latter loch is a dam that flooded the old main road and forest. Whilst I was there the water level in the loch was low and yielded the roots of the forest trees that had been cut down and provided unusual photographic subjects.

On the road south of Oban I visited the banks of Loch Laich to photograph Stalker Castle, which has a fascinating history full of Scottish clan conflict since its beginnings in 1320. This vantage point enabled me to include the rail tracks that lead to the castle from the boathouse across the loch and up into the castle.

After leaving Ullapool I stayed for a few days in South Ballachulish in order to photograph Glencoe, Rannoch Moor and Glen Etive; Glencoe was its usual brooding self. The disused slate quarry in South Ballachulish provided many photographic subjects with the silver birch trees and their yellow leaves providing a contrast against the dark colours of the quarry rock face.

On leaving Scotland I stopped off in Ilkley, Yorkshire for a couple of days in order to enjoy the local countryside in the Dales, including Scalebar Foss, which was in full flow.